Advertisement

The Scientist

» agriculture and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Fungus-Fighting Genes

Fungus-Fighting Genes

By | June 27, 2013

Two genes from wild relatives of wheat could save domestic wheat from fungal destruction.

1 Comment

image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

0 Comments

image: Ripening Genes Pegged

Ripening Genes Pegged

By | June 13, 2013

Researchers identify thousands of plant genes activated by the gaseous hormone ethylene, which influences ripening, pathogen defense, growth regulation, and more.

1 Comment

image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

0 Comments

image: Mobile Microscopes

Mobile Microscopes

By | June 1, 2013

Turning cell phones into basic research tools can improve health care in the developing world.

5 Comments

image: Oral History

Oral History

By | June 1, 2013

Researchers use DNA from ancient tooth tartar to chart changes in the bacterial communities that have lived in human mouths for 8,000 years.

1 Comment

image: The Next Big One

The Next Big One

By | June 1, 2013

As new infections surface and spread, science meets the challenges with ingenuity and adaptation.

2 Comments

image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

3 Comments

image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.

0 Comments

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?
  2. Most Earth-like Planet Found
  3. The Lies That Scars Tell
    Notebook The Lies That Scars Tell

    Macaque trainers in Bangladesh are often bitten by their monkeys, but rarely infected by a particular simian retrovirus.

  4. AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation
Advertisement
Advertisement
The Scientist