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image: A New Role for Marine Archaea

A New Role for Marine Archaea

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers discover acetogenesis in archaea, suggesting an important role for these little-studied organisms in generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

By | July 1, 2016

Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

Marine Bacteria Share Carbon Assimilation Duties

By | July 1, 2016

Taxonomic differences in bacterioplankton amino acid uptake

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image: Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

Multicellular Cooperation Curbs Cheating

By | July 1, 2016

An experimental evolution study shows that more cheaters arise when bread mold fungal cells are less related to one another.

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image: Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome

Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome

By | July 1, 2016

Researchers detail the major factors shaping the microbiomes that surround us while we work.

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image: Nobel Laureates vs. Greenpeace

Nobel Laureates vs. Greenpeace

By | June 30, 2016

Dozens of Nobel Prize winners pen an open letter, calling on the environmental organization to stop spreading false claims regarding genetically modified organisms.

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image: Dethroning <em>E. coli</em>?

Dethroning E. coli?

By | June 23, 2016

Some scientists hope to replace microbiology’s workhorse bacterium with fast-growing Vibrio natriegens.

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image: Speaking of Microbiology

Speaking of Microbiology

By | June 21, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the American Society for Microbiology’s annual meeting

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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