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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

By | June 20, 2016

Kids often acquire cavity-causing bacteria from non-family members, researchers report at the American Society for Microbiology annual meeting.

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image: Early-Life Microbiome

Early-Life Microbiome

By | June 16, 2016

Analyzing the gut microbiomes of children from birth through toddlerhood, researchers tie compositional changes to birth mode, infant diet, and antibiotic therapy.

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image: Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

By | June 1, 2016

Pooping into a petri dish is becoming standard practice as part of some college biology courses.

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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

By | May 25, 2016

Researchers assess some of the downstream effects of treating livestock with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.

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image: E.U. Delays Vote on Roundup

E.U. Delays Vote on Roundup

By | May 24, 2016

Newly published research on the key ingredient in the Monsanto-made weed killer is holding up lawmakers’ decisions on whether to continue to allow its sale in Europe.

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Post-publication peer review prompts the authors to clarify the ages of mice used in their experiments and share additional data.

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image: Report: Still Lots to Learn About GE Crops

Report: Still Lots to Learn About GE Crops

By | May 17, 2016

A National Academies–led analysis evaluates the impacts of genetically engineered crops—and calls for updated regulations.

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Researchers use a gene editor to introduce an allele that eliminates the horned trait—and thus, the need for an expensive and painful process of dehorning—in dairy cows.

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