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The Scientist

» agriculture, immunology and neuroscience

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image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Tricky Transfections

Tricky Transfections

By | March 1, 2015

A combination of microinjection and electroporation inserts genes into hard-to-reach cells.

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image: Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

By | February 25, 2015

Advances in genome-editing technologies have made modifying crops easier than ever before. They’ve also clouded the already murky realm of genetically modified foods.

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image: Fighting Allergy with Allergen

Fighting Allergy with Allergen

By | February 25, 2015

Babies who ate peanuts were less likely to develop an allergy to the food by the time they hit kindergarten, according to a new study.

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image: Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

By | February 18, 2015

Cannabinoids cause appetite-suppressing neurons to produce an appetite-stimulating hormone in mice.

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image: U.S. Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

U.S. Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

By | February 16, 2015

Apples genetically modified to resist browning can be commercially planted in the U.S., the government ruled last week.

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image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.

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image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

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image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

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image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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