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image: Fungus Versus Plant

Fungus Versus Plant

By | October 3, 2013

The crop-destroying gray mold fungus uses RNA weapons to disable plant defenses and invade.

3 Comments

image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

1 Comment

image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

6 Comments

image: Opinion: Restoring Tomato Flavor

Opinion: Restoring Tomato Flavor

By | August 28, 2013

Commercial tomatoes rarely have that fresh vine-ripened flavor that everyone loves, but the ideal recipe for tomato taste is now known. Will growers embrace the new cultivars?

4 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism

0 Comments

image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.

3 Comments

image: Fungus-Fighting Genes

Fungus-Fighting Genes

By | June 27, 2013

Two genes from wild relatives of wheat could save domestic wheat from fungal destruction.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

0 Comments

image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.

0 Comments

image: Ripening Genes Pegged

Ripening Genes Pegged

By | June 13, 2013

Researchers identify thousands of plant genes activated by the gaseous hormone ethylene, which influences ripening, pathogen defense, growth regulation, and more.

1 Comment

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