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image: Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

By | April 17, 2015

A newly discovered protein promotes immunity to viruses and cancer by triggering the production of cytotoxic T cells.

1 Comment

image: Studying Ebola Survivors

Studying Ebola Survivors

By | April 6, 2015

A scientist jumps at the chance to study the blood of four Ebola survivors to better understand how the immune system responds to the deadly virus. 

1 Comment

image: Cancer Immunotherapist

Cancer Immunotherapist

By | April 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Yvonne Saenger explains recent advances in using biomarkers to identify cancer patients who might benefit most from immunotherapy.

1 Comment

image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

3 Comments

image: Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

Yvonne Saenger: Immunotherapy Pioneer

By | April 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University. Age: 41

5 Comments

image: Study: Pesticides Harm Bees

Study: Pesticides Harm Bees

By | March 27, 2015

A researcher challenges the UK government’s conclusion that neonicotinoids aren’t that bad for pollinators.

1 Comment

image: T Cells of the Skin

T Cells of the Skin

By | March 18, 2015

A census of adaptive immune system components in human skin reveals a variety of resident and traveling memory T cells.

2 Comments

image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

1 Comment

image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

By | February 25, 2015

Advances in genome-editing technologies have made modifying crops easier than ever before. They’ve also clouded the already murky realm of genetically modified foods.

1 Comment

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