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image: Uncovering the Secrets of a Successful Pest

Uncovering the Secrets of a Successful Pest

By | May 1, 2017

The green peach aphid can colonize new host plants with ease through rapid changes in gene expression.

2 Comments

image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | May 1, 2017

Climate change, research funding, race, and much more

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: 45 Feet High and Rising

45 Feet High and Rising

By | April 24, 2017

Maize enthusiast Jason Karl aims to continue breaking his own records for the tallest corn plants ever grown.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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image: Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

By | April 1, 2017

Since first proposing that a cell’s function and biology depend on its surroundings, Mina Bissell continues to probe the role of the extracellular matrix.

2 Comments

image: Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

Making CAR T-Cell Therapy Safer

By | April 1, 2017

Following a spate of patient deaths in clinical trials testing modified T cells for the treatment of cancer, researchers work to reduce the treatment’s toxicity without sacrificing efficacy.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | April 1, 2017

Eugene Garfield, the cancer moonshot, employee genetic testing, and more

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