Advertisement
PerkinElmer
PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» agriculture, developmental biology and ecology

Most Recent

image: Study: Pesticides Harm Bees

Study: Pesticides Harm Bees

By | March 27, 2015

A researcher challenges the UK government’s conclusion that neonicotinoids aren’t that bad for pollinators.

1 Comment

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

1 Comment

image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

By | February 25, 2015

Advances in genome-editing technologies have made modifying crops easier than ever before. They’ve also clouded the already murky realm of genetically modified foods.

1 Comment

image: U.S. Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

U.S. Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

By | February 16, 2015

Apples genetically modified to resist browning can be commercially planted in the U.S., the government ruled last week.

1 Comment

image: Corn Chronicle

Corn Chronicle

By | January 8, 2015

A genetic analysis of ancient and modern maize clarifies the crop’s checkered domestication history.

0 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

1 Comment

Advertisement

Popular Now

  1. Antibiotics and the Gut Microbiome
  2. Sex Differences in Pain Pathway
  3. The Sum of Our Parts
    Features The Sum of Our Parts

    Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

  4. Anti-Vax Doctor Found Dead
    The Nutshell Anti-Vax Doctor Found Dead

    Police are calling the death of James Bradstreet, a physician who claimed vaccines cause autism and offered autism cures to patients, an apparent suicide.

Advertisement
The Scientist