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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

Ancient Europeans Were Lactose Intolerant

By | October 21, 2014

Five-thousand years after agricultural practices spread across Neolithic Europe, human populations remained unable to digest sugars from the milk of mammals.

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image: 360-Degree View of the Tomato

360-Degree View of the Tomato

By | October 12, 2014

Researchers have sequenced 360 varieties of the tomato plant to create a comprehensive map of the evolution of the fruit from its wild form to the modern varieties. 

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image: Opinion: The Planet Needs More Plant Scientists

Opinion: The Planet Needs More Plant Scientists

By | October 1, 2014

Academia is not producing sufficient PhDs in the plant sciences to solve the crop production challenges facing a rapidly growing population.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Light-Tolerant Tomatoes

Light-Tolerant Tomatoes

By | August 7, 2014

Upping the expression of a single gene improves the plant’s ability to withstand light and increases yields. 

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image: Opinion: Bumblebees in Trouble

Opinion: Bumblebees in Trouble

By | June 30, 2014

Commercialization has sickened wild bumblebees around the world. Can we save them? 

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