The Scientist

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image: 2012 Multimedia Roundup

2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics

Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics

By | December 10, 2012

Long-term exposure to antibiotics from agricultural run off may encourage the evolution of soil bacteria that break down and consume the antibacterial agents.

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image: Opinion: Evolving CO2-Hungry Crops

Opinion: Evolving CO2-Hungry Crops

By and | December 4, 2012

Breeding plants that can convert more carbon dioxide to food could help feed a growing population.

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image: How Plants Feel

How Plants Feel

By | December 1, 2012

A hormone called jasmonate mediates plants' responses to touch and can boost defenses against pests.

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image: Ancient Butterball

Ancient Butterball

By | November 21, 2012

The star of Thanksgiving was domesticated by Mayans 1,000 years earlier than previously thought.

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image: Coconut Gene Bank Threatened

Coconut Gene Bank Threatened

By | November 13, 2012

A deadly bacterial disease is knocking at the door of a crucial collection of coconut palms in Papua New Guinea.


image: Pigs Raise Blood Pressure

Pigs Raise Blood Pressure

By | November 8, 2012

Residents surrounding strongly smelling hog farms experience higher blood pressure levels as the stench worsens.

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image: Coming to Terms

Coming to Terms

By | November 1, 2012

New noninvasive methods of selecting the most viable embryo could revolutionize in vitro fertilization.


image: Contributors


By | November 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2012 issue of The Scientist.


image: Exit Strategy

Exit Strategy

By | November 1, 2012

Large RNA-protein packets use a novel mechanism to escape the cell nucleus.



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