The Scientist

» agriculture and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Putting Up Resistance

Putting Up Resistance

By | June 1, 2014

Will the public swallow science’s best solution to one of the most dangerous wheat pathogens on the planet?


image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.


image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

1 Comment

image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

1 Comment

image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

1 Comment

image: <em>BRCA1</em> Linked to Brain Size

BRCA1 Linked to Brain Size

By | March 20, 2014

The breast cancer-associated gene may play a protective role in neural stem cells, a mouse study finds.


image: Agricultural Pest Out-Evolves GM Crop

Agricultural Pest Out-Evolves GM Crop

By | March 19, 2014

The corn rootworm has become resistant to a genetically modified maize variety that produces an insecticidal toxin.


image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.


image: E.U. Pushes Forward With GM Corn

E.U. Pushes Forward With GM Corn

By | February 13, 2014

The European Commission is set to approve a new strain of genetically modified maize despite opposition from member nations.


image: Biodiversity = More (and Better) Coffee

Biodiversity = More (and Better) Coffee

By | February 11, 2014

Study finds that coffee plants grown in the vicinity of Mount Kilimanjaro produce more coffee beans of a better quality if they are surrounded by thriving plant and animal communities.



Popular Now

  1. Antidepressant Exerts Epigenetic Changes
  2. Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet
  3. Image of the Day: Mother’s Love
  4. Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed
Life Technologies