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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Study: Pesticides Harm Bees

Study: Pesticides Harm Bees

By | March 27, 2015

A researcher challenges the UK government’s conclusion that neonicotinoids aren’t that bad for pollinators.

1 Comment

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

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image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

By | February 25, 2015

Advances in genome-editing technologies have made modifying crops easier than ever before. They’ve also clouded the already murky realm of genetically modified foods.

1 Comment

image: USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

By | February 16, 2015

Apples genetically modified to resist browning can be commercially planted in the U.S., the government ruled last week.

1 Comment

image: Corn Chronicle

Corn Chronicle

By | January 8, 2015

A genetic analysis of ancient and modern maize clarifies the crop’s checkered domestication history.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

7 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

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