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image: Desperately Seeking Shut-Eye

Desperately Seeking Shut-Eye

By | March 1, 2016

New insomnia drugs are coming on the market, but drug-free therapy remains the most durable treatment.

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image: In Dogged Pursuit of Sleep

In Dogged Pursuit of Sleep

By | March 1, 2016

Unearthing the root causes of narcolepsy keeps Emmanuel Mignot tackling one of sleep science’s toughest questions.

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image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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image: What Lies Sleeping

What Lies Sleeping

By | March 1, 2016

Why can science still not define this most basic biological process?

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image: Go To Bed!

Go To Bed!

By | March 1, 2016

The immediate consequences of losing out on sleep may be harbingers of long-term repercussions.

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image: Who Sleeps?

Who Sleeps?

By and | March 1, 2016

Once believed to be unique to birds and mammals, sleep is found across the metazoan kingdom. Some animals, it seems, can’t live without it, though no one knows exactly why.

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image: Pig-to-Pig Transmission of Mosquito-Borne Virus

Pig-to-Pig Transmission of Mosquito-Borne Virus

By | February 29, 2016

The Japanese encephalitis virus, which typically moves to new hosts via mosquito vectors, can jump directly between pigs, according to a study.

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image: Week in Review: February 22–26

Week in Review: February 22–26

By | February 26, 2016

Questions about how E. coli evolves; spermatids in a dish; fighting bacteria with virus-like molecule; what drives metastasis; antibodies fight Ebola in monkeys

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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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