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image: Reading Between the Pages

Reading Between the Pages

By | March 1, 2015

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and the University of York excavate the genetic secrets contained in the DNA of old parchments.

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image: Slip Me Some Skin

Slip Me Some Skin

By | March 1, 2015

Scientists tracing the history of livestock breeding probe parchment documents for genetic information.

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image: Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

Opinion: On Global GMO Regulation

By | February 25, 2015

Advances in genome-editing technologies have made modifying crops easier than ever before. They’ve also clouded the already murky realm of genetically modified foods.

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image: USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

USDA Approves Genetically Engineered Apples

By | February 16, 2015

Apples genetically modified to resist browning can be commercially planted in the U.S., the government ruled last week.

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image: Corn Chronicle

Corn Chronicle

By | January 8, 2015

A genetic analysis of ancient and modern maize clarifies the crop’s checkered domestication history.

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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image: Along Came a Spider

Along Came a Spider

By | December 1, 2014

Researchers are turning to venom peptides to protect crops from their most devastating pests.

2 Comments

image: A Race Against Extinction

A Race Against Extinction

By | December 1, 2014

Bat populations ravaged; hundreds of amphibian species driven to extinction; diverse groups of birds threatened. Taking risks will be necessary to control deadly wildlife pathogens.

3 Comments

image: Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

By | November 24, 2014

The cold-tolerant cereal crop allowed humans to live and farm higher than ever starting more than 3,000 years ago.

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