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» agriculture and evolution

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image: Environmentally-Friendly Sheep?

Environmentally-Friendly Sheep?

By | November 13, 2011

A new model of sheep farming shows that genetic changes can help lower methane production, leading to lower greenhouse gas emission.

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image: Infection Selection

Infection Selection

By | November 13, 2011

Scientists track changes in bacterial genomes during a hospital outbreak to discover potential pathogenesis genes.

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image: A Smoke-Swirl of Birds

A Smoke-Swirl of Birds

By | November 10, 2011

A video of thousands of birds flying as a single coordinated, amorphous group stirs up questions about how they do it.

9 Comments

image: Pioneers Make More Babies

Pioneers Make More Babies

By | November 7, 2011

Women of the French families that colonized Canada in the 17th and 18th centuries had more children and grandchildren than late comers to the region.

3 Comments

image: Earliest Modern Europeans Described

Earliest Modern Europeans Described

By | November 3, 2011

A fossilized jaw bone and teeth from Western Europe are recognized as the oldest modern human fossils recovered in the region.

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image: Marriage Affects Crop Diversity?

Marriage Affects Crop Diversity?

By | October 31, 2011

Nuptial arrangements between members of African farming communities could have influenced the genetic diversity of the staple crop cassava.

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image: Bacterial Rejuvenation

Bacterial Rejuvenation

By | October 27, 2011

Bacteria age, but as a lineage, can live forever.

6 Comments

image: Bird Flu Vax Spurs Virus Evolution

Bird Flu Vax Spurs Virus Evolution

By | October 21, 2011

Inadequate poultry immunization programs may cause higher mutations rates in the bird flu virus, rendering the vaccine ineffective and increasing the threat of cross-species transmission.

6 Comments

image: <em>Wolbachia</em> Boost Stem Cell Production

Wolbachia Boost Stem Cell Production

By | October 20, 2011

The widespread bacteria known to manipulate host reproductive output can do so by ramping up stem cell division and consequent egg production in Drosophila.

3 Comments

image: New Genes, New Brain

New Genes, New Brain

By | October 19, 2011

A bevy of genes known to be active during human fetal and infant development first appeared at the same time that the prefrontal cortex—the area of the brain associated with human intelligence and personality—took shape in primates.

12 Comments

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