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image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

Cholera Confusion, circa 1832

By | February 1, 2013

As cholera first tore through the Europe in the mid-19th century, people tried anything to prevent the deadly disease. Then science stepped in.

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image: Freezing Cells

Freezing Cells

By | February 1, 2013

A handful of species have learned how to survive in freezing climates. To do so, the animals must counteract the damaging effects of ice crystal formation, or keep from freezing altogether. Here are a few ways they do it.

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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

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image: Catching the Cold

Catching the Cold

By | February 1, 2013

Tracking the genetic diversity and evolution of rhinoviruses can lead to a better understanding of viral evolution, the common cold, and more dangerous infections.

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image: Icing Organs

Icing Organs

By | February 1, 2013

Why scientists are so near and yet so far from being able to cryopreserve organs

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image: Humans Adapt to Icy Life

Humans Adapt to Icy Life

By | January 30, 2013

A genetic analysis of Siberians finds three genes that have evolved to help the populations weather the frigid winters.

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image: Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

Opinion: An Explosion of Devices

By | January 28, 2013

From cardiovascular problems to neurological disorders, a plethora of new medical devices are reducing the need for surgery and improving the quality and safety of healthcare.

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image: Stem Cells Not Rejected

Stem Cells Not Rejected

By | January 25, 2013

Researchers uncover more evidence that reprogrammed stem cells are not attacked by the immune system, suggesting they may one day serve as effective therapies.

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image: Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

Non-coding Mutations May Drive Cancer

By | January 24, 2013

The majority of human melanomas contain mutations in a gene promoter, suggesting mutations in regulatory regions may spur some cancers.

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