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image: <em>Wolbachia</em>-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

Wolbachia-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

By | April 19, 2017

The bacterium causes eggs to die, and spreading treated insects is expected to curb Aedes aegypti populations.

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image: Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

Scientists Stretch Neurons to Image Fine Structures

By | April 18, 2017

A double-expansion technique embeds brain tissue in the absorbent material of diapers to stretch out cells for easier visualization.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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By examining brainwave patterns in a posterior cortical area, scientists can predict when people are dreaming.

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By converting glial cells into dopaminergic neurons, scientists were able to partially rescue motor behavior in mice.

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image: Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

Image of the Day: Long-Distance Messaging

By | April 7, 2017

After an inflammatory injury occurs in the brain, astrocytes release extracellular vesicles that travel to the liver and trigger an immune response.

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image: Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

Paralyzed Man Moves Arm with Neuroprosthetic

By | March 30, 2017

Two chips implanted in a quadriplegic patient’s motor cortex and 36 electrodes in his right arm allow the man to control the movement of his right arm and hand.

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image: Texas Considers GM Mosquitoes

Texas Considers GM Mosquitoes

By | March 28, 2017

In an effort to prevent the spread of Zika virus, Harris County officials are in discussions with Oxitec to release insects engineered to produce short-lived offspring.

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The University of Rhode Island neurotoxicologist and dean came to the U.S. for college in the 1980s. 

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image: Consilience, Episode 2: In Tune

Consilience, Episode 2: In Tune

By | March 21, 2017

Ben Henry delves into the still-unanswered questions of where our musical preferences come from and what makes synesthetes tick.

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