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image: Loss of Potential

Loss of Potential

By | June 1, 2013

In the fruit fly, the ability of neural stem cells to make the full repertoire of neurons is regulated by the movement of key genes to the nuclear periphery.

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image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

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image: Misconduct Around the Globe

Misconduct Around the Globe

By | June 1, 2013

Research misconduct is not limited to the developed world, but few countries anywhere are responding adequately.

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image: Best Places to Work Industry 2013

Best Places to Work Industry 2013

By | June 1, 2013

Our final survey of the life-science industry workplace highlights the companies—small and large, domestic and international—that are making their researchers feel valued and at home.

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image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

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image: Week in Review: May 27–30

Week in Review: May 27–30

By | May 31, 2013

The mosquito’s role in malaria virulence; the value of grant review; Europe must embrace GM crops; why roaches avoid sugary bait

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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 23, 2013

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Ants on Burglar Watch

Ants on Burglar Watch

By | May 22, 2013

An ant species that lives on a carnivorous pitcher plant keeps nutrient thieves from escaping by eating them.

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image: Malarial Mosquitos Drawn to Human Smell

Malarial Mosquitos Drawn to Human Smell

By | May 17, 2013

Mosquitos infected by the malaria parasite are more likely to land on and probe a substrate laced with human body odor than their uninfected counterparts.

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