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Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Results from experiments in mice revise a long-held hypothesis that certain protein scaffolds are needed for synaptic activity.

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Nosing Around

By | November 1, 2016

Covering neuroscience research means choosing from an embarrassment of riches.

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Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: Immune System Maintains Brain Health

Immune System Maintains Brain Health

By | November 1, 2016

Once thought only to attack neurons, immune cells turn out to be vital for central nervous system function.

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image: Immunity in the Brain

Immunity in the Brain

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers document the diverse roles of immune cells in neuronal health and disease.

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The ribosome-associated organelle consists of tightly packed tubes, not flat sheets as previously believed, according to new super-resolution microscopy images.

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Public Health Leader Dies

By | October 26, 2016

Jack Woodall, an epidemiologist and former columnist at The Scientist, cofounded the infectious disease outbreak reporting system ProMED. 

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image: Fighting Zika with Bacteria-Laden Mosquitos

Fighting Zika with Bacteria-Laden Mosquitos

By | October 26, 2016

Scientists in South America are testing the strategy of infecting mosquitos with Wolbachia, an approach intended to reduce Zika transmission.

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image: Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

Culprit for Antibody Blockade Identified

By | October 21, 2016

Type I interferon organizes several immune mechanisms to suppress B cell responses to a chronic viral infection.

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