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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

26 Comments

image: Public Health Leader Dies

Public Health Leader Dies

By | October 26, 2016

Jack Woodall, an epidemiologist and former columnist at The Scientist, cofounded the infectious disease outbreak reporting system ProMED. 

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image: Fighting Zika with Bacteria-Laden Mosquitos

Fighting Zika with Bacteria-Laden Mosquitos

By | October 26, 2016

Scientists in South America are testing the strategy of infecting mosquitos with Wolbachia, an approach intended to reduce Zika transmission.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Congress Approves $1.1 Billion for Zika

Congress Approves $1.1 Billion for Zika

By | September 30, 2016

The money will go toward vaccine development and assisting communities at risk.

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image: Can <em>Culex</em> Mosquitoes Also Spread Zika?

Can Culex Mosquitoes Also Spread Zika?

By | September 29, 2016

Researchers report conflicting results.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | September 7, 2016

Virus’s genome to aid in diagnoses; bees caught in crossfire of mosquito sprays; Zika spreads in Asia; US Congress revisits Zika funding

1 Comment

image: Mosquitoes Inherit Zika: Study

Mosquitoes Inherit Zika: Study

By | August 30, 2016

The virus can be vertically transmitted by female Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus mosquitoes to their offspring, scientists show.

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