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image: Genetic Connections Among Human Traits

Genetic Connections Among Human Traits

By | May 16, 2016

A study identifies genetic variants that are linked to multiple phenotypes.

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image: Sea Star Comeback?

Sea Star Comeback?

By | May 9, 2016

Hordes of baby sea stars on the Pacific coast survived the summer and winter of 2015—promising news about populations that have been devastated by a wasting disease.

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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: Bacterium Blocks Zika’s Spread

Bacterium Blocks Zika’s Spread

By | May 4, 2016

Infecting mosquitoes with Wolbachia greatly reduces the insects’ abilities to transmit the virus.

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image: Transparency Now

Transparency Now

By | May 1, 2016

Science is messy. So lay it out, warts and all.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys

By | April 29, 2016

Infusing anti-HIV antibodies provides macaques with protection against infection for up to six months, according to a study.

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image: Billboards Attract Mosquitoes

Billboards Attract Mosquitoes

By | April 21, 2016

A marketing effort aims to trap Zika-transmitting mosquitoes by mimicking human scents.

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image: “Hunger Hormone” No More?

“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

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image: Mapping Worldwide Zika Susceptibility

Mapping Worldwide Zika Susceptibility

By | April 19, 2016

More than 2 billion people may be at risk, according to a map of global environmental suitability for transmission of the virus.

1 Comment

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