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» retractions and immunology

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image: Transplant Without Drugs?

Transplant Without Drugs?

By | March 8, 2012

A new method for transplanting immunologically mismatched organs may remove the need for life-long immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection.

6 Comments

image: How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

By | March 1, 2012

A lot changes in a child’s body over the course of development, and not all changes occur linearly: gene expression can fluctuate, and organs can perform different functions on the way to their final purpose in the body. Here are some of the key deve

0 Comments

image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

2 Comments

image: Child-Proofing Drugs

Child-Proofing Drugs

By | March 1, 2012

When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.

6 Comments

image: Skin-Deep Immunity

Skin-Deep Immunity

By | February 29, 2012

Immune cells in skin provide powerful protection against infection, suggesting new routes for vaccination.

6 Comments

image: Neuroscientist Guilty of Misconduct

Neuroscientist Guilty of Misconduct

By | February 28, 2012

Michael Miller is found guilty of research misconduct, having misconstrued data in four NIH grants, two papers, and one manuscript.

4 Comments

image: Switching the Bait

Switching the Bait

By | February 1, 2012

Turning a standard technique into an unbiased screen for diagnostic biomarkers

6 Comments

image: Immune Heat

Immune Heat

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

3 Comments

image: Longevity Study Lives On

Longevity Study Lives On

By | January 24, 2012

A reanalysis of the study reporting genes linked to extremely long life, which was retracted from Science last summer, is published in PLoS ONE.

3 Comments

image: More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

By | January 12, 2012

The surge in retractions may be the result of better detection tools and more vigilant journal editors, not an increase in ethical problems.

18 Comments

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