The Scientist

» retractions and developmental biology

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Debunking Junk

Opinion: Debunking Junk

By | February 9, 2015

With more and more bad science infiltrating the media landscape, it’s time for researchers to speak up.

10 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2014

The Top 10 Retractions of 2014

By | December 23, 2014

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

5 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

0 Comments

image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Researchers Update STAP Protocol

Researchers Update STAP Protocol

By | September 15, 2014

Two coauthors on the now-retracted stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies present yet another revision to the published method.

1 Comment

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