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» retractions and developmental biology

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image: Neuroscientist Guilty of Misconduct

Neuroscientist Guilty of Misconduct

By | February 28, 2012

Michael Miller is found guilty of research misconduct, having misconstrued data in four NIH grants, two papers, and one manuscript.

4 Comments

image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

0 Comments

image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

3 Comments

image: Longevity Study Lives On

Longevity Study Lives On

By | January 24, 2012

A reanalysis of the study reporting genes linked to extremely long life, which was retracted from Science last summer, is published in PLoS ONE.

3 Comments

image: More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

By | January 12, 2012

The surge in retractions may be the result of better detection tools and more vigilant journal editors, not an increase in ethical problems.

18 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Top Science Scandals of 2011

Top Science Scandals of 2011

By | December 19, 2011

A list of this year's most high-profile retractions and controversies in science

100 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

6 Comments

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