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image: Duke Sued for Millions over Fraudulent Data

Duke Sued for Millions over Fraudulent Data

By | September 6, 2016

A lawsuit claims that Duke University and biologist Erin Potts-Kant used bad data in projects funded by dozens of government grants.

2 Comments

image: TS Picks: August 9, 2016

TS Picks: August 9, 2016

By | August 9, 2016

Gene therapy money-back guarantee; the brain benefits from bilingualism; Q&A with a science watchdog

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image: More Retractions for Cancer Researcher

More Retractions for Cancer Researcher

By | June 22, 2016

An institutional investigation has found evidence of image manipulation in two studies coauthored by Bharat Aggarwal.

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image: The Zombie Literature

The Zombie Literature

By | May 1, 2016

Retractions are on the rise. But reams of flawed research papers persist in the scientific literature. Is it time to change the way papers are published?

9 Comments

image: TS Picks: February 11, 2016

TS Picks: February 11, 2016

By | February 11, 2016

Reproducibility edition

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image: Fraudulent Paper Pulled

Fraudulent Paper Pulled

By | January 5, 2016

Nature retracts a study six years after an investigation found that the protein structures it reported were fabricated.

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image: Papers Pulled for Image Manipulation

Papers Pulled for Image Manipulation

By | December 30, 2015

Scientists retract two studies from the Journal of Virology, citing another case of an author tinkering with figures.

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image: The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

The Top 10 Retractions of 2015

By | December 23, 2015

A look at this year’s most memorable retractions

2 Comments

image: Family Ties

Family Ties

By | December 1, 2015

There’s more to inheritance than genes.

3 Comments

image: Parsing Negative Citations

Parsing Negative Citations

By | October 26, 2015

A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.

0 Comments

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