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image: Fraud Breeds Retractions

Fraud Breeds Retractions

By | October 1, 2012

An analysis of retractions dating back to 1977 shows that most papers are retracted due to misconduct.

2 Comments

image: Solving Irreproducible Science

Solving Irreproducible Science

By | September 26, 2012

Will the recently launched Reproducibility Initiative succeed in cleaning up research and reducing retractions?

12 Comments

image: Do That Again

Do That Again

By | August 15, 2012

A new initiative offers gold stars to researchers willing to have their studies replicated by other labs, but will it fix science’s growing irreproducibility problem?

9 Comments

Contributors

August 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the August 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Bring On the Transparency Index

Bring On the Transparency Index

By | August 1, 2012

Grading journals on how well they share information with readers will help deliver accountability to an industry that often lacks it.

6 Comments

image: Misconduct on the Rise

Misconduct on the Rise

By | May 21, 2012

Retractions of scientific studies due to plagiarism, falsification, and other instances of researchers behaving badly have skyrocketed in the past decade.

8 Comments

image: Retractions Symptom of Flawed System

Retractions Symptom of Flawed System

By | April 17, 2012

Editors, concerned about the increasing numbers of retractions, propose solutions.

8 Comments

image: Neuroscientist Guilty of Misconduct

Neuroscientist Guilty of Misconduct

By | February 28, 2012

Michael Miller is found guilty of research misconduct, having misconstrued data in four NIH grants, two papers, and one manuscript.

4 Comments

image: Longevity Study Lives On

Longevity Study Lives On

By | January 24, 2012

A reanalysis of the study reporting genes linked to extremely long life, which was retracted from Science last summer, is published in PLoS ONE.

3 Comments

image: More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

By | January 12, 2012

The surge in retractions may be the result of better detection tools and more vigilant journal editors, not an increase in ethical problems.

18 Comments

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