Advertisement

The Scientist

» publication and microbiology

Most Recent

image: Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

By | April 3, 2012

A new study shows that grooming by ants promotes colony-wide resistance to fungal infections by transferring small amounts of pathogen to nestmates.

8 Comments

image: Bird Flu Debate Continues

Bird Flu Debate Continues

By | March 8, 2012

A series of articles published in open access journal mBio underscores the variety in opinion on whether a transmissible H5N1 strain should be studied.

6 Comments

image: Bird Flu Research Reconsidered

Bird Flu Research Reconsidered

By | March 1, 2012

Biosecurity agency will give controversial H5N1 bird flu research another look-over in light of new data and clarification.

0 Comments

Contributors

March 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

2 Comments

image: TB Screen Glows Green

TB Screen Glows Green

By | February 13, 2012

Infection by GFP-encoding viruses enables quick, easy detection of tuberculosis in patient samples.

2 Comments

image: <em>C. diff</em> Infection Source Unclear

C. diff Infection Source Unclear

By | February 7, 2012

Only a quarter of Clostridium difficile infections in one hospital system were traced to contact with a symptomatic patient.

15 Comments

image: Federal Biosecurity Panel Speaks

Federal Biosecurity Panel Speaks

By | February 1, 2012

The US National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity explains why it recommended redacting the details of studies reporting on a highly transmissible H5N1 strain.

6 Comments

image: Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

By | January 24, 2012

An attempt to regrow the infamous GFAJ-1 bacteria, reported to incorporate arsenic into its DNA backbone, has failed.

9 Comments

image: More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

More Retractions, Not Dishonesty

By | January 12, 2012

The surge in retractions may be the result of better detection tools and more vigilant journal editors, not an increase in ethical problems.

18 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist