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image: Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

Slideshow: Nerdy Birdies

By | December 1, 2016

Meet the pigeons that are redefining what it means to behave like a human by displaying remarkable pattern recognition abilities.

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image: 2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

2016 Top 10 Innovations: Honorable Mentions

By | December 1, 2016

These runners up to the Top 10 Innovations of 2016 caught our judges' attention.

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image: Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

Opinion: The Impact Factor, Re-envisioned

By , , and | November 18, 2016

A combination of the traditional metric and the newer h5 index potentiates the scientific community toward more-balanced evaluation. 

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In his latest book, the famed primatologist replaces one dogma with another.

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image: 2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2016 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2016

Most researchers feel stimulated by their work but are dissatisfied with their compensation, according to this year’s results.

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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

26 Comments

image: Social Media Accelerates Science

Social Media Accelerates Science

By | November 1, 2016

How researchers are taking advantage of Twitter and other forums to do, share, and discuss research

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Apes Seem Capable of Inferring Others’ Thoughts

Apes Seem Capable of Inferring Others’ Thoughts

By | October 7, 2016

Researchers suggest that some nonhuman primates can anticipate the actions of other animals.

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