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» cognition and cell & molecular biology

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image: On Point

On Point

By | October 11, 2013

Researchers demonstrate that elephants can use human pointing cues to find hidden food.

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image: Fighting Viruses with RNAi

Fighting Viruses with RNAi

By | October 10, 2013

The long-debated issue of whether mammals can use RNA interference as an antiviral defense mechanism is finally put to rest.

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image: Mislabeled Microbes Cause Two Retractions

Mislabeled Microbes Cause Two Retractions

By | October 10, 2013

Two papers on plant immunity have been retracted, and questions remain about others with similar results. 

9 Comments

image: Catch My Drift?

Catch My Drift?

By | October 1, 2013

Dogs are proving to be more in tune to human communication than any other animal, but how much they really understand about people’s intentions is up for debate.

6 Comments

image: New Organelle: The Tannosome

New Organelle: The Tannosome

By | September 23, 2013

Researchers identify a structure in plants responsible for the production of tannins.

1 Comment

image: Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

By | September 18, 2013

By removing a single gene, adult cells can be reprogrammed into a stem-like state with nearly 100 percent efficiency.

3 Comments

image: Out of Sync

Out of Sync

By | September 1, 2013

Why eating at the wrong times is tied to such profound and negative effects on our bodies

2 Comments

image: Mind the Clock

Mind the Clock

By | September 1, 2013

Many of the body's tissues can tell time, and these peripheral clocks can be influenced by environmental cues, such as the timing of food consumption.

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image: Money Troubles Tax the Brain

Money Troubles Tax the Brain

By | August 29, 2013

Financial concerns are tied to poorer performance on cognitive tasks.

1 Comment

image: Monkeys Accept Virtual Arms as Own

Monkeys Accept Virtual Arms as Own

By | August 26, 2013

In a variation of the classic rubber-hand experiment, researchers have shown how the macaque brain can confuse visual and tactile stimuli.

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