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Master Folder

By | January 1, 2016

Meet Susan Lindquist, the MIT biologist who has won numerous accolades for her research on protein folding.

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Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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Heart-Healthy Hibernators

By | January 1, 2016

Overwintering ground squirrels survive fluctuations in body temperature that would cause cardiac arrest in nonhibernators.

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Speaking of Science 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A year’s worth of noteworthy quotes

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AAAS Fellowship to Chemist Repealed

By | December 23, 2015

Technician’s death in Patrick Harran’s lab prompted the American Association for the Advancement of Science to yank Harran’s title as a fellow.

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Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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Agar Shortage Limits Lab Supplies

By | November 24, 2015

One large provider says the shortfall should clear up by early 2016.

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Biological Compass

By | November 16, 2015

A protein complex discovered in Drosophila may be capable of sensing magnetism and serves as a clue to how some animal species navigate using the Earth’s magnetic field.

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image: Following the Funding

Following the Funding

By | November 4, 2015

Researchers use network theory to estimate the importance of relationships among researchers and institutions in attracting grant money.

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