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Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Master Folder

By | January 1, 2016

Meet Susan Lindquist, the MIT biologist who has won numerous accolades for her research on protein folding.

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Heart-Healthy Hibernators

By | January 1, 2016

Overwintering ground squirrels survive fluctuations in body temperature that would cause cardiac arrest in nonhibernators.

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image: AAAS Fellowship to Chemist Repealed

AAAS Fellowship to Chemist Repealed

By | December 23, 2015

Technician’s death in Patrick Harran’s lab prompted the American Association for the Advancement of Science to yank Harran’s title as a fellow.

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Biological Compass

By | November 16, 2015

A protein complex discovered in Drosophila may be capable of sensing magnetism and serves as a clue to how some animal species navigate using the Earth’s magnetic field.

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image: Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston. Age: 35

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Krebs Nobel Auctioned

By | July 16, 2015

Proceeds from the sale of Hans Krebs’s Nobel Prize medal will support refugee scientists and student researchers.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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Early Code

By | June 3, 2015

New research points to key properties of transfer RNA molecules and amino acids that may have supported the origin of life on Earth.

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image: Biochemistry Pioneer Dies

Biochemistry Pioneer Dies

By | June 3, 2015

Irwin “Ernie” Rose, who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work on ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation, has passed away at age 88.

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