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image: The Inside Scoop

The Inside Scoop

By | September 1, 2012

Probing cells with nanometer-scale electrodes


image: Painting the Protein Atomic, 1961

Painting the Protein Atomic, 1961

By | August 1, 2012

Irving Geis’s revolutionary painting of sperm whale myoglobin illuminated the nascent field of protein structure.

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image: Ubiquitin Chains in Action

Ubiquitin Chains in Action

By | July 1, 2012

Present in every tissue of the body, ubiquitin appears to be involved in a dizzying array of functions, from cell cycle and division to organelle and ribosome biogenesis, as well as the response to viral infection. The protein plays at least two role


image: You Are Where You Eat

You Are Where You Eat

By | July 1, 2012

Laser-based isotope detection systems are moving into the realm of food authentication.

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image: 3-D Printing

3-D Printing

By | July 1, 2012

Is printing out your own lab equipment, molecular models, and drug compounds the wave of the future?


image: Move Over, Mother Nature

Move Over, Mother Nature

By | July 1, 2012

Synthetic biologists harness software to design genes and networks.


image: On the Chain Gang

On the Chain Gang

By | July 1, 2012

More than simply helping haul out a cell’s garbage, ubiquitin, with its panoply of chain lengths and shapes, marks and regulates many unrelated cellular processes.

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image: Ubiquitin basics

Ubiquitin basics

By | July 1, 2012

Despite its discovery as a protein that seems to show up everywhere, at least in eukaryotic cells, researchers are only beginning to scratch the surface of all of the cellular functions involving ubiquitin. 


image: Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

Designing Transition-State Inhibitors

By | May 1, 2012

A transition-state mimic has the power to bind an enzyme at its tipping point as strongly as any available inhibitor and more strongly than most, preventing enzymatic activity. 


image: Freezing Time

Freezing Time

By | May 1, 2012

Targeting the briefest moment in chemistry may lead to an exceptionally strong new class of drugs.


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