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image: Lichen Legion

Lichen Legion

By | July 2, 2014

Genetic analysis splits one species into 126.

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image: Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

By | June 30, 2014

A new model suggests emperor penguin populations could decline by 19 percent by 2100.

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image: Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

By | June 30, 2014

Mice infected with a malaria-causing parasite emit odors that are more attractive to malaria-transmitting mosquitoes than uninfected animals, a study shows.

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image: Monkey See, Monkey Don’t

Monkey See, Monkey Don’t

By | June 30, 2014

Species in a tightly knit genus of Old World primates have evolved tell-tale facial characteristics to prevent hybridization, a study shows.

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image: Combating Asian Carp

Combating Asian Carp

By | June 5, 2014

A new plan to protect the Great Lakes from the invasive species is set in motion.

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image: Wild Relatives

Wild Relatives

By , , and | June 1, 2014

As rich sources of genetic diversity, the progenitors and kin of today’s food crops hold great promise for improving production in agriculture’s challenging future.

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image: Top 10 New Species

Top 10 New Species

By | May 23, 2014

The International Institute for Species Exploration announces its picks of novel species discovered in the past year, including a carnivorous mammal, a tiny shrimp, and a fungus.

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image: Running Wild

Running Wild

By | May 22, 2014

Mice in nature appear to enjoy running on wheels, helping to settle the question whether the behavior is a just a neurotic response in lab mice.

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image: Rock Snot Explained

Rock Snot Explained

By | May 8, 2014

An increasingly common algal growth, found in rivers the world over, is caused by changing environmental conditions, not accidental introductions.

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image: Finch-Powered Fumigation

Finch-Powered Fumigation

By | May 7, 2014

Darwin’s finches use pesticide-treated cotton to line their nests and unwittingly protect themselves against parasitic fly larvae.

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