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image: Amyloid Designed to Inactivate Cancer-Related Protein

Amyloid Designed to Inactivate Cancer-Related Protein

By | November 14, 2016

Researchers build a peptide that causes a receptor to form toxic, amyloid-like clumps in cells.

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image: Amyloid Thwarts Microbial Invaders

Amyloid Thwarts Microbial Invaders

By | May 25, 2016

Alzheimer’s disease–associated amyloid-β peptides trap microbes in the brains of mice and in the guts of nematodes, a study shows. 

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image: Eyes, Nose as Windows to Alzheimer’s

Eyes, Nose as Windows to Alzheimer’s

By | July 14, 2014

Failing a sniff test or screening positive on an eye exam may predict people’s chances of developing the neurodegenerative disorder.

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image: Brain-Washing During Sleep

Brain-Washing During Sleep

By | October 18, 2013

Rest clears out interstitial clutter in the mouse brain.

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image: Tau Ligand Reveals Tangles In Vivo

Tau Ligand Reveals Tangles In Vivo

By | September 18, 2013

In living humans, researchers image snarls of tau, one of the proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease.

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image: Brain Activity Breaks DNA

Brain Activity Breaks DNA

By | March 24, 2013

Researchers find that temporary double-stranded DNA breaks commonly result from normal neuron activation—but expression of an Alzheimer’s-linked protein increases the damage.

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image: Corrupted Proteins Spread Disease

Corrupted Proteins Spread Disease

By | June 18, 2012

A protein fragment involved in Alzheimer’s can seed new clusters throughout the brain, pointing to prion-like qualities of the disease.

10 Comments

image: The Benefits of Coffee

The Benefits of Coffee

By | January 17, 2012

Researchers finally nail down why drinking coffee helps reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

24 Comments

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