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» neurons, immunology and developmental biology

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image: Neurons in Action

Neurons in Action

By | May 19, 2014

Researchers image the electrical impulses of the C. elegans and zebrafish nervous systems.

1 Comment

image: Extra Eyeballs on the Eye

Extra Eyeballs on the Eye

By | May 6, 2014

A legion of citizen-scientist gamers helps a team of researchers explain a long-standing riddle of how the retina processes motion.

1 Comment

image: Long-Distance Call

Long-Distance Call

By | May 1, 2014

Neurons may use interferon signals transmitted over great distances to fend off viral infection.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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image: Another Way Fiber Is Filling

Another Way Fiber Is Filling

By | April 29, 2014

Acetate, a short-chain fatty acid released following the fermentation of dietary fiber in the gut, accumulates in the brain and can affect appetite in mice.

4 Comments

image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

1 Comment

image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

1 Comment

image: Commander of an Immune Flotilla

Commander of an Immune Flotilla

By | April 1, 2014

With much of his early career dictated by US Navy interests, Carl June drew inspiration from malaria, bone marrow transplantation, and HIV in his roundabout path to a breakthrough in cancer immunotherapy.

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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

image: Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

Birth Defects Marked End of Mammoths

By | March 26, 2014

New research suggests that the wooly beasts may have succumbed to a shrinking gene pool or intense environmental pressures as their species went extinct.

1 Comment

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