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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?

When Does a Smart Mouse Become Human?

By | July 1, 2015

Ethical issues attend the creation of animal-human chimeras.

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image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By and | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

14 Comments

image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

3 Comments

image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.

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image: Thin-skinned Space Mice

Thin-skinned Space Mice

By | May 28, 2015

Data from three mice suggest months in space can alter the thickness and gene expression pattern of the skin.

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image: WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

By | May 27, 2015

World Health Organization officials endorse a global strategy to combat the spread of antibiotic resistance.

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image: Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

By | May 19, 2015

The midwestern U.S. and central Asia are at high risk for new disease outbreaks from pathogen-bearing rodents, according to a study.

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