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image: Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

Dental Microbes Not All in the Family

By | June 20, 2016

Kids often acquire cavity-causing bacteria from non-family members, researchers report at the American Society for Microbiology annual meeting.

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Mouse pups born to mothers fed a high-fat diet lack a gut microbe that promotes social behavior, scientists show.

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image: Early-Life Microbiome

Early-Life Microbiome

By | June 16, 2016

Analyzing the gut microbiomes of children from birth through toddlerhood, researchers tie compositional changes to birth mode, infant diet, and antibiotic therapy.

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image: Gut Bacteria Vectors

Gut Bacteria Vectors

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers mix bacteria genetically engineered to express double-stranded RNA into insect food.

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image: Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

By | June 1, 2016

Pooping into a petri dish is becoming standard practice as part of some college biology courses.

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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

By | May 25, 2016

Researchers assess some of the downstream effects of treating livestock with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.

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Post-publication peer review prompts the authors to clarify the ages of mice used in their experiments and share additional data.

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Certain drugs could worsen graft-versus-host disease in stem cell transplant patients, scientists show.

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image: Population Ecologist Dies

Population Ecologist Dies

By | May 18, 2016

Ilkka Hanski of the University of Helsinki has passed away at age 63.

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