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image: Scalp Microbiome Linked to Dandruff Severity

Scalp Microbiome Linked to Dandruff Severity

By | May 12, 2016

Researchers identify differences in the composition of microbial species living on the scalps of people with different levels of dandruff.

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image: Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotic Could Spare the Microbiome

Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotic Could Spare the Microbiome

By | May 9, 2016

A drug that singles out Staphylococcus aureus leaves gut-dwelling microbiota largely intact, a mouse study shows.

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image: Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

Breast Milk Primes Gut for Microbes

By | May 5, 2016

Maternal antibodies engender a receptive gut environment for beneficial bacteria in newborn mice.

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image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Animal Magnetism

Animal Magnetism

By | May 1, 2016

A photosensitive protein behind the retinas of cockroaches plays a role in light-dependent, directional magnetosensitivity.

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image: Transplanted Fecal Microbes Stick Around

Transplanted Fecal Microbes Stick Around

By | April 28, 2016

Donor bacteria coexist with a recipient’s own for three months after a fecal transplant.

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image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.

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image: Mouth Microbes and Pancreatic Cancer

Mouth Microbes and Pancreatic Cancer

By | April 20, 2016

The mix of bacteria living in the oral cavity is related to a person’s risk of developing pancreatic cancer, according to a study.

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image: Psychedelic Neuroimaging

Psychedelic Neuroimaging

By | April 13, 2016

“Ego dissolution,” and other things that happen to the human brain on LSD

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