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» microbiome and neuroscience

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image: Sealed With a Kiss

Sealed With a Kiss

By | November 17, 2014

A single intimate smooch can transfer upwards of 80 million bacteria.

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image: Week in Review: November 10–14

Week in Review: November 10–14

By | November 14, 2014

Funding for African science; microbiome studies may have contamination worries; mind-controlled gene expression; DNA record keeper

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image: How a Memory Is Made

How a Memory Is Made

By | November 13, 2014

Transcription factor levels dictate which neurons in a network store a memory.

1 Comment

image: Chronic Weed Use Shrinks Brain Region

Chronic Weed Use Shrinks Brain Region

By | November 12, 2014

Long-term marijuana smokers have less gray matter in their orbitofrontal cortex than nonsmokers, but other brain circuits may compensate by increasing connectivity.

2 Comments

image: DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

DNA Extraction Kits Contaminated

By | November 11, 2014

Sequencing study reveals low levels of microbes in lab reagents that can create big problems for some microbiome studies.

1 Comment

image: Mind-Controlled Gene Expression

Mind-Controlled Gene Expression

By | November 11, 2014

A light-inducible optogenetic implant in mice, powered by EEG, responds to a human participant’s mental state.

2 Comments

image: Ghostly Experiment

Ghostly Experiment

By | November 10, 2014

A robot replicates the neurological phenomenon that causes people to feel like another person is nearby.

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image: Gut Microbiome Heritability

Gut Microbiome Heritability

By | November 6, 2014

Analyzing data from a large twin study, researchers have homed in on how host genetics can shape the gut microbiome.

4 Comments

image: Great Ape Microbiomes

Great Ape Microbiomes

By | November 6, 2014

Chimpanzees, bonobos, and gorillas harbor more microbial diversity in their guts than do humans, a study shows.

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image: Brain Massage

Brain Massage

By | November 1, 2014

Researchers may be able to improve memory by discharging magnetic pulses on the skull to alter the neural activity at and beneath the brain’s surface.

3 Comments

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