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PerkinElmer
PerkinElmer

The Scientist

» microbiome and immunology

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image: Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

Cancer and Immune Cells Merge

By | December 16, 2013

Mouse colon cancer cells can fuse with macrophages, leading to changes in tumor growth.

5 Comments

image: Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

Gut Bacteria Vary with Diet

By | December 13, 2013

Extreme diets can alter the microbial makeup of the human GI tract, and change the behavior of those bacteria.

1 Comment

image: Gut Microbes and Autism

Gut Microbes and Autism

By | December 9, 2013

Dosing mice modeling autism with a human gut bacterium reversed some disorder-associated behaviors in the animals.

3 Comments

image: A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

A Cancer Culprit in Autoimmunity

By | December 5, 2013

Scientists discover that cancer can drive the autoimmune disorder scleroderma.

0 Comments

image: Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

Breast Milk Programs Memory Skills

By | December 1, 2013

Mouse mothers can improve their pups’ memories by altering levels of immune chemicals in their milk.

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image: Mapping NYC's Microbes

Mapping NYC's Microbes

By | December 1, 2013

New York University’s Jane Carlton talks about a project designed to characterize the microbiome of the Big Apple.

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image: Metropolome

Metropolome

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers take advantage of rapid and cheap DNA sequencing technologies to map the bacterial microbiome of New York City.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2013

Top 10 Innovations 2013

By | December 1, 2013

The Scientist’s annual competition uncovered a bonanza of interesting technologies that made their way onto the market and into labs this year.

1 Comment

image: Tracking Fecal Transplants

Tracking Fecal Transplants

By | November 26, 2013

A long-term study confirms transplants of stool microbes from healthy donors can successfully clear recurrent Clostridium difficile infections.

2 Comments

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

0 Comments

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