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image: Social Media Accelerates Science

Social Media Accelerates Science

By | November 1, 2016

How researchers are taking advantage of Twitter and other forums to do, share, and discuss research

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: TS Picks: October 17, 2016

TS Picks: October 17, 2016

By | October 17, 2016

Problematic dietary advice; the man whose cells were fixed with CRISPR; treating toads

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image: When Nobel Laureates Earn Their Awards

When Nobel Laureates Earn Their Awards

By | October 3, 2016

Winners in the Physiology or Medicine category are trending older, even though they’re completing their award-winning research when they are about the same age, according to an analysis.

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>An Essay on Science and Narcissism</em>

Book Excerpt from An Essay on Science and Narcissism

By | October 1, 2016

In Chapter 3, "Determining Narcissism in Science with Real-Life Examples," author Bruno Lemaitre considers Niels Jerne.

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image: Church on the Late Show

Church on the Late Show

By | October 1, 2016

Harvard biologist George Church talks gene therapy, aging, and reviving the woolly mammoth with Stephen Colbert.

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image: The Narcissistic Scientist

The Narcissistic Scientist

By | October 1, 2016

Are leading researchers driven more by the quest for knowledge or the pursuit of fame?

1 Comment

image: Thirty Years of Lab Safety

Thirty Years of Lab Safety

By | October 1, 2016

From mouth pipetting to automated liquid handling, life-science labs have gotten much safer over the past three decades.

1 Comment

image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

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