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Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

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Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Fungi Within

The Fungi Within

By | February 1, 2016

Diverse fungal species live in and on the human body.

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image: The Mycobiome

The Mycobiome

By | February 1, 2016

The largely overlooked resident fungal community plays a critical role in human health and disease.

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image: AAUP Champion Dies

AAUP Champion Dies

By | January 26, 2016

Jordan Kurland, associate general secretary of the American Association of University Professors, has passed away at age 87. 

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image: Chimps Share Microbes When Socializing

Chimps Share Microbes When Socializing

By | January 15, 2016

Social interaction influences the chimpanzee microbiome, increasing the number of microbial species the primates share.

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image: Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

Gut Microbes Need Fiber, Too

By | January 13, 2016

A low-fiber diet decimated the diversity of bacterial species in mice colonized with human gut microbes in a recent study.

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Counting Cells

By | January 11, 2016

A person likely carries the same number of human and microbial cells, according to a new estimate.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

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