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image: How Diet Influences Host-Microbiome Communication in Mice

How Diet Influences Host-Microbiome Communication in Mice

By | November 23, 2016

Researchers are beginning to decipher the metabolic language of the microbiome, and determine how gut microbes communicate with host tissue.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: TS Picks: October 17, 2016

TS Picks: October 17, 2016

By | October 17, 2016

Problematic dietary advice; the man whose cells were fixed with CRISPR; treating toads

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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