The Scientist

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image: Feeling Around in the Dark

Feeling Around in the Dark

By | May 1, 2016

Scientists work to unlock the genetic secrets of a population of fruit flies kept in total darkness for more than six decades.


image: Monkey See, Monkey Die

Monkey See, Monkey Die

By | May 1, 2016

What's killing howler monkeys in the jungles of Central America?


image: Silent Canopies

Silent Canopies

By | May 1, 2016

A spate of howler monkey deaths in Nicaragua, Panama, and Ecuador has researchers scrambling to identify the cause.


image: What’s in a Voice?

What’s in a Voice?

By | May 1, 2016

More than you think (or could make use of)

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image: Transplanted Fecal Microbes Stick Around

Transplanted Fecal Microbes Stick Around

By | April 28, 2016

Donor bacteria coexist with a recipient’s own for three months after a fecal transplant.


image: Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

Study: “Dirty” Mice More Humanlike

By | April 21, 2016

Housing laboratory mice with those reared in a pet store makes the lab rodents’ immune systems more similar to those of people.


image: Mouth Microbes and Pancreatic Cancer

Mouth Microbes and Pancreatic Cancer

By | April 20, 2016

The mix of bacteria living in the oral cavity is related to a person’s risk of developing pancreatic cancer, according to a study.


The massive rock that smashed into Earth 66 million years ago killed off many dinosaur species, but the animals were in steady decline for millennia before the cataclysm, researchers report.


image: Tracking Zika’s Evolution

Tracking Zika’s Evolution

By | April 15, 2016

Sequence analysis of 41 viral strains reveals more than a half-century of change. 

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image: Lightning-Fast Spider Bites

Lightning-Fast Spider Bites

By | April 8, 2016

Trap-jaw spiders have the fastest, most powerful bite of any arachnid, scientists show. 


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