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» European Commission, immunology and evolution

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image: In the Long Run

In the Long Run

By | December 1, 2012

Can emulating our early human ancestors make us healthier?

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | December 1, 2012

December 2012's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Plastic Genome

The Plastic Genome

By | December 1, 2012

The poxvirus stockpiles genes when it needs to adapt.

1 Comment

image: Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

Can Worms Alleviate Autism?

By | November 27, 2012

Autism researchers are testing the ability of whipworm eggs to treat autism in a new clinical trial.

10 Comments

image: European Research Spends on Errors

European Research Spends on Errors

By | November 14, 2012

An estimated 360 million Euros from the coffers of EU research funding was spent mistakenly; auditors blame overly complicated funding rules.

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image: Charles Darwin for Congress

Charles Darwin for Congress

By | November 13, 2012

Nominated as a write-in candidate as a protest against the anti-science incumbent, famed naturalist Charles Darwin won 4,000 congressional votes in a Georgia county.

1 Comment

image: Inflammation for Regeneration

Inflammation for Regeneration

By | November 8, 2012

Inflammatory signals in injured zebrafish brains promote the growth of new neurons.

1 Comment

image: Gene Therapy Arrives in Europe

Gene Therapy Arrives in Europe

By | November 6, 2012

The European Commission approves the Western hemisphere’s first gene therapy, aimed at correcting a lipid-processing disorder.

7 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

1 Comment

image: Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

Bacterial Cocktail Treats Infection

By | October 29, 2012

Mice fed a mix of six strains of bacteria were able to fight a C. difficile infection that causes deadly diarrhea and is resistant to most types of treatment.

2 Comments

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