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image: Factoring in Face Time

Factoring in Face Time

By | June 1, 2013

How the study of human social interactions is helping researchers understand the spread of diseases like influenza and HIV

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image: Week in Review: May 27–30

Week in Review: May 27–30

By | May 31, 2013

The mosquito’s role in malaria virulence; the value of grant review; Europe must embrace GM crops; why roaches avoid sugary bait

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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.

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image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.

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image: New Guardians Against Diabetes?

New Guardians Against Diabetes?

By | May 20, 2013

A new class of immune cell could protect against type 1 diabetes by suppressing other immune cells.

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image: Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

By | May 3, 2013

The brain’s role in aging; tracking disease; understanding the new flu virus; no autism-Lyme link; one drug’s journey from bench to bedside

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image: Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

Gregory Sonnenberg: Cellular Spy

By | May 1, 2013

Research Associate, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Age: 27

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image: Suited to a T

Suited to a T

By | May 1, 2013

Sorting out T-cell functional and phenotypic heterogeneity depends on studying single cells.

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image: Viruses on the Brain

Viruses on the Brain

By | May 1, 2013

Viral infections of the central nervous system may trigger cytokines that induce seizures.

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image: Why So Soon?

Why So Soon?

By | May 1, 2013

Researchers are using modern experimental tools to probe the mysterious molecular pathways that lead to premature labor and birth.

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