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image: Spotted: Emperor Penguins

Spotted: Emperor Penguins

By | April 17, 2012

Satellites are used to count the number of penguins living in Antarctica.

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image: Spotting a Giraffe's Age

Spotting a Giraffe's Age

By | April 11, 2012

A giraffe’s spots can give away its years.

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image: Insect Battles, Big and Small

Insect Battles, Big and Small

By | April 10, 2012

Social insect soldiers not only protect the colony from insect invasions; some also secrete strong antifungal compounds to kill microscopic enemies.

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image: Colony Collapse from Pesticides?

Colony Collapse from Pesticides?

By | April 9, 2012

Yet another study demonstrates that how pesticides might be related to the collapse of wild bee colonies.

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image: Poisonous Shrooms Battle Cancer

Poisonous Shrooms Battle Cancer

By | April 4, 2012

A deadly mushroom toxin shrinks pancreatic tumors in mice.

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image: Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

By | April 3, 2012

A new study shows that grooming by ants promotes colony-wide resistance to fungal infections by transferring small amounts of pathogen to nestmates.

8 Comments

Deliberating Over Danger

By | April 1, 2012

The creation of H5N1 bird flu strains that are transmissible between mammals has thrown the scientific community into a heated debate about whether such research should be allowed and how it should be regulated.

16 Comments

image: Whirlpool Bistros

Whirlpool Bistros

By | April 1, 2012

Fish adapt to feed for months along the entire depth of massive oceanic whirlpools that are rich in nutrients and plankton.

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image: Risky Research Review

Risky Research Review

By | March 30, 2012

A new policy will require federal agencies to perform a careful review of research involving 15 pathogens and toxins that could be used for bioterrorism, including H5N1.

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image: Pesticide Problems for Bees

Pesticide Problems for Bees

By | March 30, 2012

Bees exposed to neonicotinoids, a widely-used class of pesticide, navigate poorly and produce fewer queens, suggesting a role for neonicotinoids in colony collapse.

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