The Scientist

» avian flu and ecology

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image: Ozone Defender Dies

Ozone Defender Dies

By | March 13, 2012

Nobel Laureate Sherwood Rowland, who first demonstrated that the ozone layer could be destroyed by chemical pollutants, passes away at age 84.

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image: The Sweet Sounds of Spider Silk

The Sweet Sounds of Spider Silk

By | March 7, 2012

A researcher spins spider silk into violin strings.

4 Comments

image: Antarctic Invasion

Antarctic Invasion

By | March 5, 2012

Invasive species threaten the most pristine place on Earth.

4 Comments

image: Bird Flu Research Reconsidered

Bird Flu Research Reconsidered

By | March 1, 2012

Biosecurity agency will give controversial H5N1 bird flu research another look-over in light of new data and clarification.

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Contributors

March 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: One Year On

One Year On

By | March 1, 2012

Some thoughts about the ecological fallout from Fukushima

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image: Climate Conflict of Interest?

Climate Conflict of Interest?

By | February 24, 2012

Greenpeace flags researchers' payments from a climate change skeptic organization.

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image: Bird Flu Prevalence Underestimated

Bird Flu Prevalence Underestimated

By | February 23, 2012

Pooled data from H5N1 bird flu studies suggests that the World Health Organization may be underestimating infection and overestimating fatality.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 21, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Bird Flu Paper Publication Delayed

Bird Flu Paper Publication Delayed

By | February 17, 2012

The World Health Organization announced today that it recommends publishing the two controversial H5N1 papers in full, as soon as a few details are worked out. And Science is listening.

6 Comments

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