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Seeing Things

By | October 1, 2015

In Oliver Sacks's 2009 TED Talk, the famed physician and writer describes the neurological nature of hallucinations.

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Special Delivery

By | October 1, 2015

Neurons in new brains and old

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Sweet and Low

By | October 1, 2015

Glucose activates sleep-promoting neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

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image: The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s

The First Neuron Drawings, 1870s

By | October 1, 2015

Camillo Golgi’s black reaction revealed, for the first time, the fine structures of intact neurons, which he captured with ink and paper.

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Undertaker's Bane

By | October 1, 2015

Harvard Professor Marc Weisskopf discusses the potential link between formaldehyde and ALS.

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Whistle Stop

By | October 1, 2015

Visit the remote Turkish village where the musical language that residents use to communicate across valleys is elucidating how language is processed in the brain.

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Whistle While You Work Your Brain

By | October 1, 2015

Communication based on whistles offers a “natural experiment” for studying how the brain processes language.

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Brain Gain

By | October 1, 2015

Young neurons in the adult human brain are likely critical to its function.

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Sex Differences in the Brain

By | October 1, 2015

How male and female brains diverge is a hotly debated topic, but the study of model organisms points to differences that cannot be ignored.

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image: Endogenous Retrovirus Active in ALS

Endogenous Retrovirus Active in ALS

By | September 30, 2015

Researchers uncover evidence that a retrovirus embedded within the human genome may play a role in the pathology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

2 Comments

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