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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

Fruit Flies Feel Humidity with Dedicated Receptors

By | September 1, 2016

Drosophila antennae let the insects seek out moisture levels they like best.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Multiple Sclerosis: Is Yawning a Warning?

Multiple Sclerosis: Is Yawning a Warning?

By | September 1, 2016

Neuropsychologist Simon Thompson found a possible link between yawning and multiple sclerosis. So what better way to get under the skin of his research than volunteering to take part in one of his experiments?

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image: Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

Orchid Bees Use Simple Eyes to Detect Polarized Light

By | September 1, 2016

The second visual field may aid in navigation.

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Neurons in the lamprey spinal cord can sense pH and counteract changes from the body’s optimal range.

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image: Profile: Dean Buonomano Studies How the Brain Encodes Time

Profile: Dean Buonomano Studies How the Brain Encodes Time

By | September 1, 2016

The UCLA neurobiologist uses computational modeling, in vitro electrophysiology, and human psychophysics experiments to explore how neurons and the brain as a whole perceive and respond to time.

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image: Dogs Respond to Words and Inflection

Dogs Respond to Words and Inflection

By | August 31, 2016

Using an MRI scanner to examine how dogs’ brains process speech, researchers find that our canine companions hear both what we say and how we say it. 

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“Ultimate DISCO” uses a solvent that shrinks whole animals and preserves fluorescence for months.

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Researchers use the CRISPR/Cas system to express three transcription-factor genes, changing the identities of mouse cells.

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