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image: Neutralizing HIV

Neutralizing HIV

By | June 18, 2015

Engineered immunogens based on conserved patches of the virus’s envelope protein point to new strategies for vaccine design.

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image: Circadian Clock Transplant

Circadian Clock Transplant

By | June 12, 2015

Scientists establish a functional circadian rhythm in bacteria that don’t possess one naturally.

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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image: New Immunity

New Immunity

By | June 1, 2015

A scaffolding protein forms the hub of a newly identified immune pathway in plants.

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image: Maturation of the Infant Microbiome

Maturation of the Infant Microbiome

By | May 13, 2015

Gut microbial communities from breastfed babies are slow to resemble adults’ microbiota.

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image: Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

By | May 11, 2015

Researchers find evidence that measles vaccines reduced deaths from other infectious diseases due to “immune amnesia.”

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image: Outsmarting HIV

Outsmarting HIV

By | May 4, 2015

Small molecules that mimic the T-cell surface receptor CD4 could expose the virus to antibody-based immune responses.

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image: Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

Filippos Porichis: Immunoregulator

By | May 1, 2015

Principal Investigator, Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard. Age: 33

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image: Llamas as Lab Rats

Llamas as Lab Rats

By | May 1, 2015

From diagnostics to vaccines, llama antibodies point to new directions in HIV research.

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image: Looking for Latent HIV

Looking for Latent HIV

By | May 1, 2015

Sequencing HIV integration sites suggests that clonally expanded T-cell populations may not be the main source of latent virus.

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